Relationship between female menstruation and it’s adverse effect on the brain

Females experience a spike in mood changes once a month for a minimum of 3 days. Men have long tried to understand if that’s due to a “hysteria” or internal bodily changes. The medical scientists like Dr.Max Mongelli try to understand the impact of hormonal secretions during this specific time of the month and its impact on the brain.

In the beginning, there was “hysteria” surrounding female menstruation. From the doctors of Ancient Egypt to the Greek philosophers, men have reflected on this condition for millennia. The telltale signs were extremely broad including erotic fantasies and anxieties but one thing was always certain, it only occurred to women.

Females experience a spike in mood changes once a month for a minimum of 3 days. Men have long tried to understand if that’s due to a “hysteria” or internal bodily changes. The medical scientists like Dr.Max Mongelli try to understand the impact of hormonal secretions during this specific time of the month and its impact on the brain.

In the beginning, there was “hysteria” surrounding female menstruation. From the doctors of Ancient Egypt to the Greek philosophers, men have reflected on this condition for millennia. The telltale signs were extremely broad including erotic fantasies and anxieties but one thing was always certain, it only occurred to women.

Plato, the famous Greek philosopher, believed that hysteria was caused by the belly of mourning, which made women sad when they were not carrying a baby.

His contemporaries said that this arose when the organ digressed, and thus ended up being trapped elsewhere. This belief persisted until the 19th century when the disorder was notoriously treated by bringing women to orgasm with the first vibrators.

To this day, the notion that female biology can confuse their brain is a hallmark of popular culture. If the woman is in a bad mood, asking if she’s menstruating or she is sexually aroused, is quite common.

This is even true – some women actually feel more anxious and irritable during the menstrual period and become more sexually aroused when the egg is released.

Positive impact

But what is not well known is that the menstrual cycle can affect the brain of the woman in positive ways.

Certain skills such as the spatial notion, improve soon after menstruation. Three weeks later, they are significantly better at communicating – and strangely, more able to tell others they are afraid.

Instead of torn wombs, the main source of these changes are the ovaries, which release estrogen and progesterone in varying amounts throughout the month. Hormones primarily have the function of thickening the wall of the uterus and deciding when to release the egg. They also have profound effects on the brain and the woman’s behavior.

But this mountain of knowledge was not born of a fascination with female biology. Instead, it was stimulated by a desire to understand the ways in which men and women are different – and the Whys!

An example of this difference is in the brain. The physical differences between the sexes extend to these wrinkled organs, and scientists have suspected for years that this is because of the hormones.

Studies conducted by Gynecologists such as Dr. Max Mongelli have shown that fluctuations in sex hormones are completely natural. “These variations arising due to the menstrual cycle among women can also be affected due to seasonal fluctuations in testosterone levels in men,” says Max Mongelli.

Plato, the famous Greek philosopher, believed that hysteria was caused by the belly of mourning, which made women sad when they were not carrying a baby.

His contemporaries said that this arose when the organ digressed, and thus ended up being trapped elsewhere. This belief persisted until the 19th century when the disorder was notoriously treated by bringing women to orgasm with the first vibrators.

To this day, the notion that female biology can confuse their brain is a hallmark of popular culture. If the woman is in a bad mood, asking if she’s menstruating or she is sexually aroused, is quite common.

This is even true – some women actually feel more anxious and irritable during the menstrual period and become more sexually aroused when the egg is released.

Positive impact

But what is not well known is that the menstrual cycle can affect the brain of the woman in positive ways.

Certain skills such as the spatial notion, improve soon after menstruation. Three weeks later, they are significantly better at communicating – and strangely, more able to tell others they are afraid.

Instead of torn wombs, the main source of these changes are the ovaries, which release estrogen and progesterone in varying amounts throughout the month. Hormones primarily have the function of thickening the wall of the uterus and deciding when to release the egg. They also have profound effects on the brain and the woman’s behavior.

But this mountain of knowledge was not born of a fascination with female biology. Instead, it was stimulated by a desire to understand the ways in which men and women are different – and the Whys!

An example of this difference is in the brain. The physical differences between the sexes extend to these wrinkled organs, and scientists have suspected for years that this is because of the hormones.

Studies conducted by Gynecologists such as Dr. Max Mongelli have shown that fluctuations in sex hormones are completely natural. “These variations arising due to the menstrual cycle among women can also be affected due to seasonal fluctuations in testosterone levels in men,” says Max Mongelli.

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